See The USA Going To Jackson MS.

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Jackson, Mississippi

How many of you are done with not traveling, social distancing, and wearing a face mask? Me too! I am going to Jackson, Mississippi, virtually of course.

I can hear Reese Witherspoon and Joaquin Phoenix singing the song in Walk the Line and then Minny (Octavia Spencer) teaching Celia Foote (Jessica Chastin) how to fry chicken in Crisco The Help.

“[Crisco] ain’t just for frying. You ever get a sticky something stuck in your hair, like gum?… That’s right, Crisco. Spread this on a baby’s bottom, you won’t even know what diaper rash is…shoot, I seen ladies rub it under they eyes and on they husband’s scaly feet…Clean the goo from a price tag, take the squeak out a door hinge. Lights get cut off, stick a wick in it, and burn it like a candle…And after all that, it’ll still fry your chicken.”

The scene is memorable and Minnie says Crisco in such a way that made me want to see the area.

(FYI words appearing in blue are links you can click on. To tour Pensacola, click on the arrow.)

 

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The movie currently is under scrutiny for its recent popularity on Netflix. . . but I am tired of sitting at home.

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Author Eudora Wetly Museum

Jackson is the state capital and there are many sights to see, although like all cities the coronavirus pandemic has left its mark.

King Edward Hotel and Lobby

The distance from my house to Jackson is728 miles and a 13-hour drive. So I’ll spend the night or a few days in Pensacola Beach, but the first stop is Gainesville. probably for lunch. Gainesville is the largest city in the region of North Central Florida and home of the University of Florida, the nation’s ninth-largest university campus by enrollment. What impressed me about the area is the trees. The aerial will give you a good view. There are some YouTube advertisements that you have to wait through. It is worth the wait if you want to travel virtually. Remember the benefits of virtual travel; it cost nothing, you are never stuck in traffic and is enviromentally smart.

Unlike the beaches on the east coast, the Gulf sand is pure white in color. The water smothers the shoreline with a butterfly kisses.  You may want to visit  Apalachicola  it is near by.

Please watch the above virtual tour. She does an excellent job of telling travelers about the area. Have a good time.

 

                    . . . . just saying

 

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What Have You Been Thinking?

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Baby Breath

I have not been thinking much. I could call it brain fog or fizz, however, I prefer pause. My brain is on pause. There is no debate on whether handshaking and hugging are things of the past or who will win the next presidential election. I avoid watching the news and skim the newspaper. What I do ponder is; who invented dental floss and when did fast-talking become acceptable? Hopefully, it is aging and not a yet to be identified dementia.

I searched online.  Evidently, ancient ruins reveal chewsticks and horsehair as floss has been used for a long time. In 1898 Johnson & Johnson patented dental floss.  I did not know that.

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Pickled Beet and Grapefruit Salad

I have to stop imagining a virtual Thanksgiving dinner, so when I sat down to eat lunch thought; are there many vitamins in the beets?  There are; manganese, iron, vitamin B9, vitamin C, potassium, and betanin.

According to Jim

Manganese

“Manganese is a vital nutrient found in veggies and fruits. Beets have a lot of manganese which directly promotes bone health. This mineral is essential in the development of bones. When combined with other nutrients, manganese helps in maintaining a healthy bone mineral density.”

Iron

“If you have always wondered does beetroot contains iron, you are not alone. I discovered a beetroot source of iron and found my replacement for the pan-fried liver. Iron is vital for your body to keep diseases like anemia at bay. Beets iron also helps with boosting the body’s immune system function. The iron content in beetroot juice also helps in boosting hemoglobin, reducing fatigue, and improve concentration. Iron improves your sleep pattern as well.”

Vitamin B9

Vitamin B9 or “Folate assists in the formation of red blood cells. It is also a core nutrient in the synthesis of DNA which determines our human attributes. Combined with vitamin C, vitamin B9 promotes gut health and helps the body absorb proteins better. If you are into fitness, red beet vitamins can help you bulk up faster.”

Vitamin C “is a common ingredient in our meals. It helps us fight the common cold by boosting our immune system. As a water-soluble vitamin, vitamin C lowers stroke by 42%. Vitamin C is rich in antioxidants which slow down the aging process. This vitamin also helps in reducing inflammation and staving off cardiovascular” disease.

Potassium

Potassium “is also one of the vitamins and minerals in beets. It reduces the risk of stroke and hypertension. Increased intake of potassium also promotes the excretion of excess sodium via the urine. Potassium is also good for heart health.”

Betanin

“Betanin is the food additive that gives beet its red hue. As one of the beet juice vitamins, Betanin has antioxidants effects on the body. It promotes skin health and reduces the rise of free radicals in the blood. Just like other beetroot vitamins, Betanin also helps in regulating blood pressure.”

I did not know any of that and now glad I eat beets.

My search for fast-talking revealed nothing about the practice. You know what I am talking about. People speed speaking. I can hear the sounds, however, can not process the content.

Hopefully, it is aging and not a yet to be identified dementia.

What have you been thinking?

                        . . . .Just saying

 

If You Come To Florida

If You Come To Florida

I feel like Ginger Rogers dancing backward in the arms of Fred Astaire trying to get my barrings. World War Two bombs are not being dropped, however, the coronavirus and police brutality are in the air. Even virtual travel seemed risky, so I searched through my photos of where I have been. If you ever get to Florida, come prepared to visit the Stetson Mansion.  

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The John B. Stetson House, built-in 1886 for the hat manufacturer and designed by George T. Person, an architect from Philadelphia, in 1886 is an historic home in Deland, Florida.

The Stetson Mansion is well known for its Holiday Home Tour and I have been there several times during the Christmas season.

Stetson Mansion ranked third in the nation by USA Today for the Top Ten Readers’ Choice Best Holiday Tours in 2019. Tours are scheduled for the year 2020 beginning in November. The pictures below were taken on an off holiday tour of the home and quilts were displayed.

20140802_102345Home owners, Michael and JT, lived there when I toured. They purchased the historic house in 2005. Their creativity shows in the details. On the tours I attended, JT gave the tour, walking us through the mansion. The website gives extensive information about its history and the renovation process in a drop-down menu. 

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The woodwork is amazing.  20140802_102731   Flooring, no room is exactly the same

20140802_102325The handiwork of the quilts was top notch.

20140802_102716The master bedroom wardrobe was transformed into a bathroom. The original doors conceal its whereabouts in the room.

20140802_102232This is a must-see restoration. The kitchen has all the conveniences necessary for catering and yet maintains the integrity of the home. The website tells you everything you would want to know.

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The Stetson Mansion is beautifully decorated for Christmas. Be sure not to miss it.

Other winners in the Top Ten Best Holiday Historic Home Tour were:

  1. Graceland – Memphis
  2. Wildwood Manor House – Toledo, Ohio
  3. The Stetson Mansion – Deland, Fla.
  4. Filoli Historic House and Garden – Woodside, Calif.
  5. Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens – Akron, Ohio
  6. Meadow Brook Hall – Rochester, Mich.
  7. Brucemore – Cedar Rapids, Iowa
  8. Glessner House – Chicago
  9. The Mount – Lenox, Mass.
  10. Webb Deane Stevens Museum – Wethersfield, Conn.

I have toured White House at Christmas twice and been to the Stetson Mansion several times but never to the other homes on the list.  Are any of these on your list?

      . . . just saying

Red White And Blue

adbdbb06-7ba9-4aac-8787-0af095d59a5b                This photo inspired the poem

                                     Red White and Blue

Can an itsy bitsy bug be patriotic?
His red, white, and blue symbolic
A political
view
Understand freedom . . . be equal too

Like a school-age kindergartner
Raise his hand to hold the flag
Chosen, glad about honor
Knows to say a prayer

Can an itsy bitsy bug be patriotic?
Puff his chest, recite the pledge
Listen to the voice within
Battle for the helpless, not let the bullies win!

Stand side by side with those who care
Silently and stare
Misty eyed while taps are played for those who dare
Think America is beautiful

Can an itsy bitsy bug be patriotic?

. . . . just saying

 

Previous post, “Bored On The Fourth of July”

 

Cranky, Crabby and Cantankerous

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Cranky, Crabby and Cantankerous

Cranky, crabby and cantankerous

I have the coronavirus blues

What’s a person to do?

Make someone else miserable, too?

I bought some flowers

It wasn’t a cure

Just the best I could do

For the coronavirus blues

I’ve mastered Sudoku, Celebrity Cipher

The crossword. . .

Well, I can answer a few

I’ve read Becoming, a good book, and tried writing one too

How about you?

Do you have the coronavirus blues?

You know the symptoms

Cranky, crabby, cantankerous, grumpy, grouchy and . . .

Grateful. . .

For this time in our lives

To make wrongs right

Learn how to fight. . . fair

Disagree, clear the air

Everyone’s life matters

Don’t dare use color as an excuse for human abuse.

I bought some flowers

It wasn’t a cure

Just the best I could do.

Do you have the coronavirus blues?

You know the symptoms

Cranky, crabby cantankerous, grumpy, grouchy and

Hopeful . . . things will be different.

     . . . . just saying

 

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Who Or Whom Are We Protecting?

Who Are We Protecting? Or, Oops, Is It Whom?

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Friday night, we invited friends over for pizza. I had put an extra leaf in the table and after everyone was properly distanced and had removed their face covers the conversation turned to masks. Should they be mandatory and who, or is it whom, were we protecting anyway?

We sat and talked, two males and two females married to each other. Oops, that is not quite right. The girls were married to the guys and the guys were married to the girls. Well, you get the picture, two old white married couples. Oops, I did not mean to imply only white straight people stay married.

So, forget about gender, race, age, or sexual orientation. Four adults sat around the table talking.

“I wear a face mask to protect me.”

“Really? Doesn’t my wearing the mask protect you?”

“They should be mandatory. People in the grocery store aren’t wearing masks. I got yelled at the other day.”

“You weren’t wearing a mask? You came to our front door wearing one.”

“No, I was yelled at for wearing a mask. What about my First Amendment Rights?”

“Well, it’s hard to believe a piece of fabric really protects us. What about gargling with Listerine?”

“My mask prevents molecules from the transmission into the environment. I’m protecting you.”

“But you don’t have the virus.”

“I don’t have the virus yet.”

“Right. Your mask protects you.”

“We wash our hands. Why not wash out our mouths. We should be gargling.”

“Would public gargling be considered a First Amendment Right?”

“Why isn’t the media reporting on gargling?”

The discussion was interrupted by television coverage that a statue of Calvin Griffith, a former owner of the Minnesota Twins, was removed for racial comments he made in 1976.  Other incidents of statues being taken down flashed across the screen. Many of them not peaceful. In Seattle police questioned who, or is it whom, to protect when activists injured and killed two fellow protestors. Police across the country faced similar challenges. Who to protect?

The conversation resumed.

“So, who, or is it whom, are the police protecting?”

“They were protecting them.”

“No. The police were protecting US.”

“Shouldn’t they protect everyone?”

One of the men put his head in his hands and like the grandfather in the movie Moon Struck lamented, “I’m so confused,” and then ask, “why can’t we watch baseball?”

“It’s not on.”

So, is it who or whom?

Who is the subject of the verb and whom is the object.

In the sentence, who/whom are we protecting? The subject is we. Are is the verb. Therefore, the answer is; whom are we protecting? Oops, that is right unless it is wrong.

  . . . just saying

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Is Today Friday?

456 pic from cell may 2019 154Is Today Friday?

Monday morning, as soon as I was out of bed, the day felt like a Friday. The newspaper indicated it was Monday, June 1st. But, seeing the day and date in print didn’t help. It clearly felt like a Friday.

Tuesday, the next morning, did not feel like a Saturday. Why had Monday felt like a Friday?

By Wednesday, the week seemed to be on track until, my husband said, “Boy this week is going fast.” Then Wednesday adopted a few nuances of Thursday.  

Finally, on Friday it felt like Friday, probably because we had pizza for dinner.

Has any of this ever happened to you?

I asked,  Google; Why does it feel like Friday?

 “Fridays are associated with the ending of work/school, so people are happier and go to parties, bed later, etc. See, if you associate something with the day and it doesn’t happen, it can feel like a different day.”

It is a stretch. . . But if Monday is associated with work, and I am retired, therefore, work did not happen; the day might feel like a different day. Logically, however, the different day,  should have been Saturday. I have to assume they missed my notation about pizza for dinner.

According to Google, People also ask;

  • Why does the day feel so short?
  • Why is the day dragging?
  • Why do days of the week feel different?

These are questions I frequently ask, along with other questions, i.e., What is cow tipping?

Asking the right question is more important than finding the right answer.

Why can’t every day feel like Friday?

What do you think?

. . . . just saying

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You Got To Smize

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You Got To Smize

Yesterday, I read Susan Sparks article, “Put on your mask . . . and smize,” in our local newspaper, The Daytona Beach News Journal.

I want to pass along her message.

Rev. Susan Sparks is senior pastor of Madison Avenue Baptist Church in New York City. Prior to working for God, she was a trial lawyer and a stand-up comedian. To clarify; first she argued for a living, then cracked jokes, before saying amen . . . Let’s talk about the lord.

I’m not Baptist, but enjoy her articles and perspective.

She wrote about a recent venture in the city. While, everyone wore masks that covered their mouths, she caught someone in a smile, by looking at their eyes.

Evidently, Trya Banks, coined the word to advise other models about how to really smile.

The gist of the article is; although a smile is a reaction to feeling happy, a smile can create a happy feeling. In other words, a smile can change a mood.

There is little to smile about in recent news. Especially the tragic public killing of George Floyd by a police officer in Minneapolis.

There’s concern that the coronavirus will have long lasting effects on how people interact. Talk of the potential harm isolation does.

I’m not suggesting we smile about these heartbreaking appalling events.  But that we continue to smile, with our eyes first.

 

. . . just saying

Readers, you can open up the links to Susan Sparks and Trya Banks by scrolling over the colored text.

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See The USA In Your Chevrolet . . .But Not

 

Virtual Travel

Fallingwater Tour

Fallingwater, a house designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright in 1935, is located in Mill Run, Pennsylvania, and about an hour south of Pittsburgh. The house, the former weekend home for the Kaufmann family (owners of Kaufmann Department store),was designed and built partly over a waterfall.

Needless to say it is unique, well known and one of the places I would like to visit before I die. That’s why I’m going to Pittsburgh this week. It is now a museum and can be toured. . . BUT NOT. . .Because of the coronavirus.   The weather forecast sounds perfect; mild eighties, sunny and zero chance of rain. So I’m going, virtually of course.

I’ll explain.

The year 2020 was going to be a year of travel.  After all, if not now, when?

So, I ordered a Push Pin Travel Map.

The framed map came with a cheery post card from owners, Mike & Brenda, saying, “Hip hip horray!“ and to please use the push pins to “track past travels and dream of future ones,” I was excited. The television advertising jingle, See The USA in Your Chevrolet, sung by Dinah Shore, popped-in and stayed in my head. It was not going to be a Thelma and Louise adventure.

Then the coronavirus hit.

Pittsburgh is one of many places I’d like to visit. My husband asked. “Why?”

“Because I’ve never been there.”

The city sits at the junction of three rivers and includes several “Gilded Age” sites; Carnegie Museum of Natural History and Museum of Art, the Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens.I have always wanted to visit the city. I even know where I’ll stay.

The Renaissance Hotel.

 The Renaissance hosts Braddock’s Side Street Grill, specializing in American dishes, and Prelude Wine Bar. French-American cuisine is served at Braddock’s American Brasserie. The online pictures and description made me drool.

I believe our room has a view of the Ohio River. It’s way above my budget . . .But Not.

The Andy Warhol Museum is 2,650 feet from the Renaissance. The hotel is 15 minutes’ drive from the Pittsburgh Zoo and Aquarium. Clink on the link below to see more.

But, Pittsburgh is a thirteen hour drive from northern Florida. We’ll stop along the way.  and spend the night in Roanoke, Virginia. Someplace cheap or maybe not. Virtual travel is basically free. Even gas expenses has been waved.  Hopefully we’ll still be awake after dark to take in Roanoke’s well know attraction, a man made star on Mill Mountain.

(Mill Mountain in Roanoke,  Falls City Pub in Mill Run and Kaufmann’s Dept. Store)

 

I enjoyed my virtual visit to Pittsburgh. Someday I’ll walk the streets, people watch and soak in the river view. And see more of the USA

.   .  .  .just saying

 

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Perturbed

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     When I overheard someone say the word perturbed recently, the word danced around in my head until I put pen to paper and wrote this vignette.
 

Perturbed

The police station hugs the railroad tracks in this rural New Jersey town. I contemplate retirement most mornings and especially today, as I skip over rain puddles to the precinct door. When I climb the steps, an umbrella pokes my neck. Inside I turn around and observe a woman hiding a closed umbrella in a corner. Then she walks toward me, her hand extended and says, “I’m Dolores.”

Usually, I am not quick to shake hands, but do so automatically and introduce myself.  “Officer Hawkins. How can I help you?”

“My husband went missing last night.”

Her voice is raspy. Her long jet-black hair parted on the side, frames the opposite eye. I wish I had gotten a haircut, or at least trimmed my mustache.

I respond. “Standard procedure is to wait twenty-four hours,” then stomp my feet on a rug, “your guy will probably show up before that.”

“Officer Hawkins, it’s so unlike Steven.” Her doe like brown eyes fill with tears.

“Well, file a missing person’s report if you want.”

I walk behind my desk, and search for the appropriate form. Dolores eases into an interview chair uninvited, and slips off her raincoat, to reveal; what my ex-wife called, a sweater dress.  She trembles at the sight of the paper work, reacting as though it is a hot potato.

Reluctantly, I complete the form for her. She describes Steven as tall, dark, and handsome. Then quickly produces his wallet. The contents spill out. She gathers the singles and worn scrapes of paper with her hands and almost perfectly manicured red nails. The index finger nail is broken.

I say, “Tell me what happened last night.” Her lips purse together before she responds.

“I was perturbed.”

Her pronunciation; emphasis on the first syllable without ignoring the rest, grabs my attention. I confirm her intent. “Perturbed. . . As in annoyed, agitated, or troubled.”

“Yes,” she studies the ceiling, “so. . . I took the dog for a walk,” she pulls nervously at a sleeve, “when I got back, Steven wasn’t there.” She tugs repeatedly at the dress to cover her knees. “I was perturbed.”

I mimic what she says, “You were perturbed?”

Now her doe eyes light with anger as she contains her passion. “Yes, perturbed,” she slips into her coat and stands, “what don’t you understand? Surely you’ve been perturbed, Officer Hawkins.”

She is guilty. But of what, I do not know . . . yet.

I watch her leave the building perturbed.

. . . . just saying

 

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